State funding available for land use, economic development in North Attleborough

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North Attleborough's downtown business
North Attleborough's downtown business area.
Coin show Sunday November 20th at 9:00 AM 52 Bulfinch street

By Adam Bass-abass@northstarreporter.com

Rep. Adam Scanlon (D-North Attleborough) has secured funding from an economic development bill to pay for local projects.

In a press release published on Nov. 7, Scanlon celebrated a bill signed by Gov. Charlie Baker that invests $3.7 billion in economic, labor, and workforce development.

Of that, $150,000 that would be directed for the assessment and remediation for land-use and economic development opportunity study in North Attleborough to address flooding and pollution challenges in the Ten Mile River.  Another$150,000 will be used for a business development collaborative incubator that would incentivize investment and growth of new and existing businesses.

“We are thrilled millions of dollars will be invested into our local communities and small businesses to lift our local economies, Scanlon said. “Addressing issues impacting water quality and transportation needs are a major factor in attracting commercial development in our communities.”

In the neighboring city of Attleboro, Scanlon and his colleagues Sen. Paul Feeney (D-Foxboro) and Rep. Jim Hawkins (D-Attleboro) worked to secure $100,000 directed towards the Industrial

Development Strategy initiative. This will focus on areas of strength in the workforce and land opportunities for up-and-coming businesses.

Other investments from the economic bill include $75 million for hotels, $45 million for businesses reaching underserved markets, $40 million for small businesses, $115 million for water quality improvement projects through the Massachusetts Clean Water Trust, and $112 million to support the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), including for implementation of Federal Transit Authority (FTA) directives.

One piece of legislation omitted from the bill is a series of tax relief measures directed toward low-income taxpayers.  The measures were originally planned to be passed in late July during the end of the legislative session.   Senator Feeney said It was punted at the last minute due to $3 billion in tax refund checks and direct deposits prompted by Chapter 62– much to the dismay of Baker, House Speaker Ronald Mariano (D-Quincy), and Senate President Karen Spilka (D-Ashland)

Governor-Elect Maura Healey wants to pass the tax relief as one of her first acts.  In an interview with CNN on Nov. 10, Healey said that while the state is in good fiscal shape, passing tax relief for low and middle-income individuals and families will help make life more affordable for them.

“Yes we have some headwinds,” Healey said regarding inflation. “But I think Massachusetts is in solid shape to deal with that going forward.”