North student joins Rhode Island College’s softball team

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Morgan Collupy (right) and her father Tim wear their matching Rhode Island College shirts to commemorate Morgan committing to the school on Friday, Feb. 26. Morgan will play for the team's softball team and plans to major in sports management. Staff Photo/Max Bowen

By Max Bowen-max.bowen@northstarreporter.com

For the last 12 years, Morgan Collupy has been a regular on the softball field and says that the sport is a good stress relief

Though her time at Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School comes to a close, her role in sports will continue on. On Feb. 26, Collupy, of North Attleborough, formally committed to playing Division III softball for the Anchorwomen at Rhode Island College. It was one of many schools she was looking at, including Plymouth and Salem State.

Morgan’s father Tim said it was the conversation she had with RIC Head Softball Coach Brian Claypool that helped her make the decision. Morgan added that the school being close to home was a factor, along with it having the major she wants to pursue—sports management.

I think the coach was the one who finally sold her on RIC,” said Tim that Friday. “He made her feel at ease within those two hours (of conversation). He made her laugh.”

Tim added that Claypool “preached academics first, family second, and softball third,” and that he was very welcoming. Morgan said she’s heard good things about the team, that they stand by each other. When she got the news that she has been accepted to RIC, she ran upstairs to find her father and give him the good news.

I’m looking forward to building a friendship with the team and make a family and start my life,” said Morgan, a Mayflower League and Sun Chronicle All Star.

Claypool said that due to COVID, recruitment has become a challenge with so many seasons canceled. He got the chance to see Morgan play during the summer with the Central Mass Thunder Gold Softball—a program where former college players teaching the mental and physical aspects of the sport. He said that Morgan has skills in a number of areas and he’s excited to work with her.

These kids become my temporary family for four years, so it’s got to be a good fit both ways,” he said.

Claypool added that balancing sports and academics isn’t hard if one has the passion, and he’s always clear about that when talking to students.

If you have the passion for both, it will be a great and quick four-year ride,” said Claypool.

Stephanie Caffrey is the head coach for the Cougars, Tri-County’s softball team and has worked with Morgan all four years that she has been on it. When Morgan first joined, the team was in need of new pitchers.

She walked in and we said dear God, thank you!” said Caffrey with a laugh.

When not pitching, Caffrey said that Morgan is a great infielder, sometimes playing first base when not on second. Morgan is consistent when up to bat, and Caffrey said that when she takes a swing, “I knew the ball was going to hit the grass.”

Caffrey said that when Morgan moved from freshman to sophomore, she worked to adjust her skills as a softball player. Over the last two seasons, Morgan has pitched approximately 75 percent of the games.

I was thrilled for her, she deserves it,” said Caffrey. “She pushes herself. It’s no surprise at all (that she was recruited). I’m happy for her and her family that it gets to continue. She’s achieving what she worked so hard for.”

Morgan said she started playing T-ball as a child and has stuck with softball since. Among the lessons she’s learned from the sport is that a positive attitude is a must, even when things aren’t going well— and not just for one’s own benefit.

If you’re negative, it brings down the whole team and then no one’s doing good—you always have to cheer on,” said Morgan. “I’ve learned you always have to stay positive in life, because it does have an impact on you.”